Michigan Diabetes Research Center: MICPC: Imaging: Gallery

Nikon A1 Images

Mitochondrial Trafficking in Sensory Neurons

Time series images were taken on the Nikon A1 confocal microscope. Mitochondria were labeled with a Mito-RFP baculovirus in murine primary sensory neurons. Primary senosry neuron cultures were provided and imaged by Amy Rumora, Eva L. Feldman, M.D. Ph.D., Department of Neurology and Stephen I. Lentz, Ph.D., Laboratory Director of Imaging, MICPC.

Live 3D Imaging of Adipose Tissue

Transgenic mice expressed a Rosa26--loxP-memTom-loxP—memGFP x Adiponectin-CRE. Adipose tissue was imaged in z-series on the Nikon A1 confocal microscope and rendered in 3D with Imaris software by Ziru Li, Brian Learman, B.S., and Ormond A. MacDougald, Ph.D., Department of Molecular and Integrated Physiology.

Islets in human pancreas tissue section

 

On the left side is a 22x22 XY array was taken with a 10x objective on the Nikon A1 confocal microscope and stitched together with Nikon Elements software. The right side image is a single 10X view of islets. Human islet tissue was stained and imaged by Leena Haataja, Ph.D. and Peter Arvan, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes.

3D reconstruction of a mouse pancreatic islet transduced with adenovirus

Confocal imaging shows the infection efficiency and penetration depth of adenovirus used to deliver PFK2/FBPase2 mutants, based on expression of an IRES2-linked Cherry (red). The islet was counterstained for 1 h at 37C with the cell-permeant dsDNA binding dye PicoGreen (green), which labeled nuclei strongly and mitochondria weakly, and imaged live on the Nikon A1 confocal microscope by Matthew J. Merrins, Ph.D. and Leslie Satin, Ph.D., Department of Pharmacology.

Olympus FV500 LSCM Images

Colocalization of Zn++ transporter and insulin in insulin secretory granules

Colocalization of Zn++ transporter (green) and insulin (red) within insulin secretory granules of INS-1 rat pancreatic cell line. Cells were imaged on the Olympus FV500 confocal microscope by Antonio R. Lara-Lemus , M.D., Ph.D. and Peter Arvan, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Diabetes, University of Michigan.

Confocal Images of Isolated Pancreatic Acini

Pancreatic acini were stained with synaptic vesicle markers (green and red) and nuclei (blue). The image on the left is the original image taken on the Olympus FV500 microscope and the image on the right is the same image that is restored with AutoQuant deconvolution software.

Isolated pancreatic acini were made in the Laboratory of John A. Williams, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Neurology, University of Michigan

Staining and images were done by Stephen A. Ernst, Ph.D., Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan

Mouse Footpad Intraepidermal Nerve Fibers

Mouse footpads were sectioned at 30 μm and stained for intraepidermal nerve fibers (Protein Gene Product 9.5, green). A z-series was taken on the Olympus FV500 confocal microscope and then Volocity software was used to visualize and animate the 3 dimensional signal.

Mouse footpads were isolated in the Laboratory of Eva L. Feldman, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Neurology, University of Michigan

Staining and images were done by John M. Hayes, B.S., Department of Neurology, University of Michigan

Tissue Sections of Pancreatic Islets from 4 Week Old Control (Wistar) and Diabetic (ZDF) Rats Stained with Antibodies Against Insulin and Nestin

   

   

 

 

Images can be processed to subtract auto fluorescence associated with red blood cells (RBC)

From the laboratory of Charles Burant, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan

Micrographs courtesy of Stephen Lentz, Ph.D., Laboratory Director of MIAC, University of Michigan

Confocal Images Representing Changes in Intracellular Calcium Concentrations Over Time in Neurons Using Ultrasensitive Protein Calcium Sensors (GCaMP6)

Micrographs courtesy of Paula B. Goforth, Ph.D., Department of Pharmacology and Martin G. Myers, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes, University of Michigan